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Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival

Flash Point 2017: Twenty-Five Years After the 1992 Los Angeles Uprising

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Part of the Meyer and Renee Luskin Lecture Series

The city of Los Angeles has not been the same since April 29, 1992. With racial tension peaking and riots sparking across the city, it became clear that Los Angelenos were demanding a drastic change in the relationship between police officers and racial minorities.

Twenty-five years after the LA uprising, there is still a question of the treatment of people of color and the socio-political factors in Los Angeles. As our city continues to navigate modern activism, it is crucial to reflect on the history of political and social organizing that has created the Los Angeles of today.

The Luskin School has committed to social justice, public interest, and empowering communities, and facilitates these interests through its academia. However, academia is also impacted by racial and economic disparities in the environment.

Join us as we utilize art and media to examine the socio-political factors that provoked the 1992 LA Uprising and its impact on the racial and economic climate in LA and across the US today.

The events will include two panels featuring a discussion of the evolution of community organizing as well as the role media, particularly film, has played in creating and reflecting social change. There will be a gallery displaying a variety of art inspired by the Uprising and a follow-up discussion with the artists.

For more information, please visit Flash Point 2017 site.

In partnership with:
Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival, Institute on Inequality and Democracy at UCLA Luskin, Ralph Bunche Center for African American Studies, UCLA Asian American Studies Center, UCLA Center for EthnoCommunications, UCLA César E. Chávez Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies, UCLA Department of History, UCLA Institute of American Cultures, UCLA Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, and Visual Communications

 

Program Schedule

 

Friday, April 28th 

11:00 AM – 5:15 PM | Luskin Conference Center, 425 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Sa-I-Gu: The Los Angeles Uprisings 25 Years Later – Witnessing the Past, Envisioning our Future

The UCLA Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion will be hosting this day of panels, Keynote Address, and a CrossCheck Live to examine this historic event from multiple perspectives including community retrospectives, contemporary analyses, and forward-thinking dialogue that contemplates the future of Los Angeles.

Please RSVP: https://equity.ucla.edu/events/429lauprisings25/

 

Friday, April 28th to Sunday, April 30th

Friday April 28 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM | VIDA

Saturday April 29 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM | VIDA

Sunday April 30 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM | VIDA

Exhibition: ART GALLERY

Featuring the work of Grace Misoe Lee, Grace Lee, and Patrick Martinez.  Visual Communications archival videos will also be presented.  

 

Saturday, April 29th

2:00 PM – 4:00 PM | Tateuchi Democracy Forum @ JANM

Screening: WET SAND: VOICES FROM LA (Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, 2004)

followed by

Panel: The Lessons of WET SAND and the Challenges of Re-Imagining Community

 

Twenty-five years on, what does Los Angeles look like today? What’s changed? What has remained the same? And what can we say that the “healing process” has accomplished? Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, director of WET SAND: VOICES FROM L.A. and her cinematographer and collaborator Charles Burnett will participate in a discussion with local community leaders to assess the successes and challenges we face in moving toward a more culturally, socially, and politically equitable society in post-Rebellion Los Angeles.

Panelists include Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, Ayuko Babu, Robin D.G. Kelley, Charles Burnett, Funmilola Fagbamila, Tani Ikeda, Alison de la Cruz and moderated by Professor Abel Valenzuela.

 

4:30 PM | Aratani Central Hall @ JANM

MEDIA AND SOCIAL CHANGE

For better or for worse, our community vision and self-image has been shaped by — and in some unfortunate instances, tainted — by the way communities of color have been portrayed in mass media and popular entertainment. In this special conversation with filmmakers, scholars, and cultural workers, we will assess whether progressive change can be enacted by a paradigm shift in how we are portrayed onscreen, in print, and in other forms of commercial and independently-produced communication.

Panelists include Justin Chon, Ananya Roy, Gaye Theresa Johnson, Jenny Yang, and moderated by Phil Yu.

 

8:00 PM | Aratani Theatre @ JACCC

LA UPRISING 25TH ANNIVERSARY SCREENING: GOOK (Justin Chon, 2017)

Presented by UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs

 

 

Sunday, April 30th

2:00 PM | VIDA

ARTIST TALK

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear the featured artists – Grace Lee, Grace Misoe Lee, and Patrick Martinez – discuss their process and how the 1992 Los Angeles Uprising influenced their work.  

 

 

April 29, 2017


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WET SAND: VOICES FROM L.A.

FREE PROGRAM. Filmmaker Dai Sil Kim-Gibson explores the aftermath of the 1992 LA Civil Unrest in Wet Sand. She revisits Los Angeles to learn what changes have occurred since then, only to discover that living conditions have deteriorated for the communities' most stricken. This essential follow-up probes deeper into the racial and economic issues that not only shaped the climate of 1992 Los Angeles, but also continues to affect all Americans today.

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C3: Saturday - UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs as part of the Meyer and Renee Luskin Lecture Series: “Media and Social Change”

For better or for worse, our community vision and self-image has been shaped by — and in some unfortunate instances, tainted — by the way communities of color have been portrayed in mass media and popular entertainment. In this special conversation with filmmakers, scholars, and cultural workers, we will assess whether progressive change can be enacted by a paradigm shift in how we are portrayed onscreen, in print, and in other forms of commercial and independently-produced communication. *Panels are not individually sold. The admission fee for one day will include all the panels on that day. The admission fee for both days will include all the panels of the C3 Conference.

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GOOK

CENTERPIECE FILM | Eli and Daniel are two Korean-American brothers who own a struggling shoe store. They have a unique and unlikely friendship with a young 11-year-old African American girl, Kamilla. The film is set during the first day of the LA riots, forcing them to defend their store while contemplating the future of their own personal dreams and the meaning of family.
8:00 pm
RUSH ONLY